Lifestyle Economics

The IEA's jointly signed letter appears in The Sun

A letter signed by the Institute of Economic Affairs calling for the Government to support an anti-smoking policy that embraces harm reduction and to not slap a tax on vaping. Bringing in any tax on the habit of vaping would undermine public health and be inconsistent with Government policy. The Government must not place additional ... Continue reading

IEA report on e-cigarettes features in the Daily Mail

The Institute of Economic Affairs' work on vaping and e-cigarettes has featured in the Daily Mail. The arrival of e-cigarettes on the British market preceded a sharp decline in smoking. The number of smokers in the country declined from 20.4 per cent in 2012 to 15.8 per cent in 2016. By 2016 two million vapers ... Continue reading
Lifestyle Economics

Chris Snowdon comments in The Sun

Chris Snowdon, Head of Lifestyle Economics at the Institute of Economic Affairs has commented in The Sun on the prospect of a vaping tax. The story reports that Britain's 2.9million vapers could be taxed as Treasury bean counters try to find ways of funding the extra £20billion pledged to the NHS. Chris Snowdon said that a ... Continue reading

Chris Snowdon writes for the Metro

Chris Snowdon, Head of Lifestyle Economics at the Institute of Economic Affairs has written for the Metro making the case for the legalisation of cannabis. There are several compelling reasons for reform. Legalisation would allow the police to focus on more serious crime. Wiping out the black market would make it harder for children to ... Continue reading

Chris Snowdon writes for City AM

Chris Snowdon, Head of Lifestyle Economics at the Institute of Economic Affairs has written for City AM following the release of the IEA's new report on sin taxes. The cost to the average British family of the recently implemented sugar levy will be relatively trivial, but it would rise to £500 a year if the ... Continue reading
Lifestyle Economics
Are “sin” taxes on food, soft drinks, tobacco and alcohol regressive? As my colleague Christopher Snowdon has outlined in his latest report, this is a question that shouldn’t really need to be asked. Any tax that takes a greater share of income from the poor than the rich is, by definition, regressive. End of story. ... Continue reading

New IEA report features in The Sun

An IEA report on sin taxes and how regressive they are has featured in The Sun. Sin taxes should be scrapped because they cost the poor up to TEN TIMES as much as rich people, a new report argues. Levies on alcohol, tobacco and fizzy drinks are often presented as a way to help disadvantaged ... Continue reading
Research

Sin taxes can cost poor families up to ten times more than they cost the wealthy

Summary: There should be no debate about whether taxes on food, alcohol, tobacco and soft drinks (‘sin taxes’) are regressive. It can be easily demonstrated empirically, and countless studies have done so. As with most indirect taxes, they take a greater share of income from the poor than from the rich in all plausible scenarios. ... Continue reading

IEA releases report on the harmful effects of sin taxes

Taxes on food, alcohol, tobacco and soft drinks hit the pockets of the poorest the hardest. A new report from the Institute of Economic Affairs shows that poorer households pay up to ten times more in sin taxes than richer households as a share of their income. With the exception of air passenger duty, all sin ... Continue reading

Chris Snowdon appears on BBC Radio 5 Live

Chris Snowdon, Head of Lifestyle Economics at the Institute of Economic Affairs has appeared on BBC Radio 5 Live to discuss childhood obesity. In the interview Chris argues that the figures on childhood obesity released today are not new. The childhood obesity figures haven't actually gone up for the last 15 years. The reason why ... Continue reading