Research

No-Deal Fear Checker, No 8

According to the latest Whitehall analysis, the UK economy could be between 6.3% and 10.7% smaller in a no-deal scenario, compared to remaining in the EU. These figures refer to the level of GDP around 15 years after the UK’s new relationship with the EU comes into effect. Another study by the Bank of England ... Continue reading
Government and Institutions
By far the least interesting aspect of the Brexit campaign is that it won. What should be much more mystifying for those flummoxed by recent events is that, even on a bad day, the Leave vote would have probably been somewhere in the region of 35-45%. This irreducible core of euroscepticism, near-half of the electorate ... Continue reading

Trade sanctions rarely work & create substantial costs for the world economy, says new IEA report

Summary: During the twentieth century, economic sanctions became more prevalent. In the twenty-first century they have become a frequently used tool for governments seeking to change the behaviour of other countries.  An extensive research literature exists on the effectiveness of sanctions. Overall the research shows that sanctions very rarely achieve foreign policy goals. At the ... Continue reading

IEA releases report on the side effects of trade sanctions

More and more, governments are using sanctions as a tool to change the behaviour of other countries - most notably the USA. But according to a new IEA report released today, these sanctions are often ineffective and can have damaging consequences. The report, 'Blocking Progress: The damaging side effects of economic sanctions', makes the case ... Continue reading
Government and Institutions
Continued from Part 1. Furthermore, the condition of poverty is not uniform and some will endure more hardship than others. HBAI data do allow us to make some distinctions. 1.5 million children are classified as living in conditions of low income and material deprivation in 2016/17 (before housing costs). That is 11 per cent. The ... Continue reading
Government and Institutions
When Britain leaves the European Union, it will herald the departure of one of the bloc’s major defence spenders, and its keenest opponent of military integration. Almost 25% of current EU military expenditure comes from the UK. Britain has long maintained its preference for NATO, blocking any moves towards an integrated defence force. But could ... Continue reading
Research
Summary UK and EU officials have agreed the text of a draft Withdrawal Agreement and an outline of a ‘political declaration’ on the future UK-EU relationship. The transition period anticipated in the Withdrawal Agreement will effectively keep the UK in the Customs Union and the Single Market until the end of 2020, with all ‘four ... Continue reading
Government and Institutions
How has the Royal Mail fared since its privatisation in 2013? As with previous partial privatisations, the government moved a quasi-monopoly industry into the private sector – yet key elements of the former system remain in place. Royal Mail maintains requirements to collect and deliver throughout the UK six days a week – and the ... Continue reading
Economic Theory
…continued from Part 1 My IEA paper “The Mirage of Democratic Socialism: An Alternative History” describes a hypothetical socialist state, which tries, and fails, to reinvent itself. It starts with bold reform measures, but in the end, it ends up once again pretty much where it started. Some of my socialist detractors on social media ... Continue reading
Government and Institutions

Kate Andrews is referenced by The Telegraph

Kate Andrews, Associate Director of the Institute of Economic Affairs, has featured in an article by The Telegraph on foreign aid spending, off the back of her appearance on Question Time. DfID’s ring-fenced foreign spend now exceeds the amount that goes on policing in England and Wales, a point made well on BBC Question Time ... Continue reading