Education
Universities minister Jo Johnson has reported that having a degree is worth on average £250,000 in higher lifetime earnings to a woman. “Remarkable”, you must be thinking. How can three years of being a student, instead of spending that time learning on the job and working one’s way up the career ladder, possibly make one ... Continue reading

Sophie Sandor writes for CapX

Sophie Sandor, Programmes Manager at the Institute of Economic Affairs, has written for CapX on higher education. In her article Sophie argues that both sides of the tuition fees debate share the same objective: more students enrolled in British universities. But that assumption isn't necessarily right. Young people are typically eager to get on, be ... Continue reading

Mark Littlewood writes for iNews

Mark Littlewood, Director General at the Institute of Economic Affairs has written for iNews on the topic of university tuition fees. In his article Mark argues that the idea that graduates should make no contribution towards the tertiary education they will significantly benefit from, while expecting the minimum wage hairdresser in Hull or waiter in ... Continue reading
Continued from Part 1   Like British businesses, British universities need to look outside Europe as they plan for the post-Brexit future. Remember that, in world terms, EU universities are not strong performers. If you look at the Times Higher Education World University Rankings, Oxford, Cambridge and Imperial are in the Top 10. UCL, LSE ... Continue reading
Universities are the worst place to talk positively about Brexit – in one YouGov poll 9 out of 10 academic staff apparently thought Brexit will have a negative impact on the higher education sector, while only 8% of the respondents admitted to having voted Leave. How should we read this? That university folk are particularly ... Continue reading

Len Shackleton writes for The Telegraph

Len Shackleton, Editorial Research Fellow at the Institute of Economic Affairs has written for The Telegraph on the reality of how much universities actually help students into work. In his article Len argues that this week's publication of details of the employment and earnings of recent graduates show that we must radically qualify the belief ... Continue reading
Today, University College London is hosting the Grand Challenge of Justice and Equality Round Table meeting on Labour Market and Working Parents Post Brexit. The IEA’s Prof Len Shackleton is one of the participants, and the article below is based on his opening remarks.   I look at the childcare sector very much as a ... Continue reading

Len Shackleton writes for City AM

Len Shackleton, Editorial Research Fellow at the Institute of Economic Affairs has written for City AM on our education system and how it can be reformed. In his article Len argues the long-term issues that face our education system include excessive numbers of examinations, incompetent and overbearing Ofsted inspections and an ever-more-prescriptive national curriculum. Governments ... Continue reading

Mark Littlewood comments in The Times

Mark Littlewood, Director General at the Institute of Economic Affairs has commented in The Times today on Jeremy Corbyn's recommendation for universal provision of free school meals for all primary children. In the article Mark argues that free school meals provision is already a poorly targeted policy and extending it to all primary school children ... Continue reading

Reaction to Jeremy Corbyn's recommendation on free school meals

Commenting on Jeremy Corbyn's recommendation to provide free school meals for all primary school children, Mark Littlewood, Director General at the Institute of Economic Affairs said: “Free school meals provision is already a poorly targeted policy and extending it to all primary school children would be an unacceptable waste of taxpayers’ money. The scheme will ... Continue reading