Trade, Development, and Immigration
Today the Institute of Economic Affairs republishes a paper outlining one option for a comprehensive framework for future trade relationships between the United Kingdom and the European Union. Plan A+ was first published in September 2018. Its publication followed the Chequers White Paper, which outlined the approach of then Prime Minister Theresa May and her government to ... Continue reading
Research
The opportunity before the UK as a result of Brexit is, this paper proposes, a great one: but if the UK squanders it, what has been described as the ‘new normal’ of limited economic growth could prevail, with an EU system that does not appear to be responding on a competitive level to the challenges ... Continue reading

Kate Andrews writes for City A.M.

News that the government may allow foreign students to stay in the UK for two years past their graduation date changes their lives "infinitely for the better" says Kate Andrews, Associate Director at the Institute of Economic Affairs. Writing in her weekly column in City A.M., Kate recounts her own experiences with the UK's visa ... Continue reading
Trade, Development, and Immigration

Ralph Buckle writes for CapX

Now we are leaving the European Union, we have the opportunity to develop an immigration policy which is truly open, welcoming, and allows us to make the most of what the world has to offer, says Ralph Buckle, Head of Programmes at The Institute of Economic Affairs. Writing in CapX, Ralph argues that Prime Minister ... Continue reading
Trade, Development, and Immigration

Victoria Hewson comments on the creation of up to ten Freeports after Brexit

Commenting on the announcement that up to ten Freeports will be created after the UK leaves the EU, the Institute of Economic Affairs' Head of Regulatory Affairs Victoria Hewson said: "Done right, Freeports can be transformative. This announcement sends a strong message that the UK is serious about embracing the freedoms that come with leaving the ... Continue reading
Trade, Development, and Immigration
The gains in economic activity derived from free trade are well established. Adam Smith and David Ricardo, who respectively discussed the importance of specialisation and comparative advantage, are often cited as the first to have formally illustrated the benefits of trade. However, the benefits of specialisation have long been well-understood: writing in the 1st century ... Continue reading

Kate Andrews writes for The Telegraph

The IEA's Associate Director Kate Andrews has written for The Telegraph on the Johnson administration's approach to free trade deals. "The UK needs to look to its greatest ally, the United States, to formally expand the Special Relationship beyond our historical and social ties, and affirm our economic ties as well. "Now more than ever, ... Continue reading

Kate Andrews writes for the Telegraph

The IEA's Associate Director Kate Andrews has written for the Telegraph on Trump's 'go home' tweets and how they are out of kilter with the Republican party's traditional perspective on immigration. "The surge of anti-immigration sentiment in the Republican Party is ugly and frightening - and completely out of kilter with long-standing tradition. A few years ... Continue reading
Trade, Development, and Immigration

Liam Fox quotes IEA research in The Times

Supporting UK businesses to export goods and services could help generate £32bn in revenue for the exchequer, says Dr Liam Fox MP, Secretary of State for Trade. Quoting research from the Institute of Economic Affairs, Dr Fox sets out plans to support UK businesses, enabling them to take advantage of growing overseas markets and sell ... Continue reading

Blythe Edwards writes for CapX

As both contenders for the Conservative leadership pledge to consider lifting the £30,000 earning requirement for migrants to the UK, Blythe Edwards writes for CapX arguing against the cap. Blythe, Communications Assistant at the IEA, notes that the cap means junior doctors, healthcare assistants, and nurses at the start of their careers would all be ... Continue reading