Trade, Development, and Immigration
Today marks the 155th anniversary of the death of one of the most important figures in the history of free trade and classical liberalism. Few have heard the name Richard Cobden, but his work changed the entire the global economy forever. Cobden was a 19th century British politician and textile manufacturer who was born in ... Continue reading
Trade, Development, and Immigration

Adam Bartha writes for 1828

"Paying off autocratic leaders to keep the “problem” away is both unsustainable and morally reprehensible for a union of countries which prides itself on being a beacon of liberal, humanitarian values" says Director of EPICENTER Adam Bartha. Writing for 1828, Adam argues that after five years of delay, EU governments should immediately agree on a ... Continue reading
Trade, Development, and Immigration
At this time of the rapid spread of coronavirus we can, of course, easily see one the downsides of globalisation. However, globalisation has been coming under pressure for some time with some even questioning its economic benefits. For example, this is, President Trump: “You go to New England, Ohio, Pennsylvania …manufacturing is down 30, 40, sometimes 50 per cent. NAFTA ... Continue reading

Mark Littlewood quoted in City AM

"Removing barriers to trade with the 93 per cent of the world’s population who don’t live in the European Union is a vital task", says Mark Littlewood, Director General of the Institute of Economic Affairs, quoted in City A.M. Responding to the UK government setting out its objectives for a US-UK free trade deal, Mark ... Continue reading
Trade, Development, and Immigration
Commenting on government plans for a UK-US Free Trade Agreement, IEA Director General Mark Littlewood said: "Removing barriers to trade with the 93% of the world’s population who don’t live in the European Union is a vital task. A trade deal with the United States may well have considerably greater benefits than are imagined. The government will ... Continue reading
Trade, Development, and Immigration
Although the coronavirus scare has dampened the protests in Hong Kong, last year’s events attracted worldwide attention which has not been forgotten. At the peak, around 30% of Hong Kong’s population came out in protest. It has been speculated that the reason why the Beijing government did not choose to impose a military crackdown is ... Continue reading
Trade, Development, and Immigration

Mark Littlewood quoted in the Daily Express

Mark Littlewood, Director General at the Institute of Economic Affairs, has told the Daily Express he is "supremely confident" of a positive outcome from the ongoing Brexit negotiations. Mark told the paper he believed the three most likely options - a Canada-style deal, a piecemeal deal covering key areas, or a deal agreed in the ... Continue reading
Trade, Development, and Immigration
Trade has lifted billions of people out of poverty by fostering international cooperation, expanding consumer choice, and above all, by integrating developing economies into the global economy. The impact of trade is incredibly far-reaching in scope. One word that conveys the essence of trade most accurately is empowerment. Men and women of different cultures, races, ... Continue reading

Kristian Niemietz writes for CapX

Shutting out low-skilled migrants might be popular, but that doesn’t make it a good policy argues Dr Kristian Nietmietz, Head of Political Economy at the Institute of Ecnomic Affairs. Writing for CapX, Kristian argues that the government's new proposed points-based system for immigration - which would come into effect in January 2021 - has some ... Continue reading

Dr Kristian Niemietz quoted in The Telegraph

Quoted in Telegraph, the IEA's Head of Political Economy, Kristian Niemietz warns that the new system “puts too much power in the hands of central government” and says businesses are “better placed than the state to decide what is missing from the current labour market”. A points-based system risks businesses facing a crippling shortage of ... Continue reading