Government and Institutions
Mrs. May’s latest Brexit speech provided some welcome clarity on the UK’s preferred transitional arrangements and puts the ball back firmly in the EU’s court. The speech was also refreshingly upbeat about the future relationship. However, the result of the match remains in doubt. Forgetting the politics and personalities for a moment, the Brexit talks ... Continue reading
Government and Institutions

The IEA's Brexit Unit comments on the Prime Minister's Florence Speech

Commenting on the Prime Minister's Florence Speech, Julian Jessop, Chief Economist at the Institute of Economic Affairs, said: “Mrs. May’s upbeat Brexit speech provided some welcome clarity on the UK’s preferred transitional arrangements and puts the ball back firmly in the EU’s court. “The offer to pay the UK's EU contributions until the end of ... Continue reading

Julian Jessop writes for the Times Red Box

The IEA's Chief Economist Julian Jessop has written for the Times Red Box on his predictions for the Prime Minister's Florence speech. Julian notes that an offer to continue the UK’s contributions until the end of the current EU budget period in 2020 would be consistent with the €20bn being mooted in the press. The EU ... Continue reading
Economic Theory
My report A Trade Policy for a Brexited Britain, published by the Institute of Economic Affairs last month, had a short section on EU tariffs. I gave the example of how in October last year EU tariffs on orange imports were quintupled from 3.2 percent to 16 percent. This example has been challenged by some on the Remain side, ... Continue reading

Julian Jessop writes for The Telegraph

Julian Jessop, Chief Economist at the Institute of Economic Affairs has written for The Telegraph following Jean-Claude Juncker's annual State of the Union speech to the European Parliament. In his article Julian argues that unfortunately, at every point Juncker's instinct - and that of most Eurocrats - is to push for the EU to do ... Continue reading
Government and Institutions
Is now the right time to consider a transitional deal between the UK and the European Union? On our podcast this week, IEA Chief Economist Julian Jessop and Digital Officer Madeline Grant discuss the varying options for transitional arrangements for March 2019 - after the UK has left the EU, but before it pursues its ... Continue reading
Government and Institutions
The Sunday Times has claimed that the Prime Minister is ready to approve a financial settlement of ‘up to £50bn’ when the UK leaves the EU. As it happens, this estimate is based on similar principles to those the IEA Brexit Unit has proposed in the past. But rarely have the two words ‘up to’ ... Continue reading
Economic Theory
Two reports published in the last few days have advocated the benefits of free trade. You might have expected them to be well received by the economics commentariat. In fact, many responses have been sceptical, with some downright hostile. What on earth has gone wrong? The first paper, written by Prof Kevin Dowd and published ... Continue reading
Many experts predicted dire economic consequences if Britons should go against their advice and vote for Brexit. Prof Barry Eichengreen began his recent Guardian comment article – The experts strike back! How economists are being proved right on Brexit – by conceding that “The early post-referendum evidence suggested, to the surprise of many – or ... Continue reading
Energy and Environment
Many people believe that Brexit will be bad for the environment. The EU has major responsibilities in this policy area, and it is feared that, after Brexit, policy priorities will be realigned. In the UK, Green movements tend to be pro-EU. For example, the Green Party strongly supports EU membership, though sometimes their philosophy is ... Continue reading