6 thoughts on “Poverty-stricken, in relative terms”

  1. Posted 16/01/2009 at 14:07 | Permalink

    Hi Kris,

    This is nice. I’m packing my bags, as we speak–wait, I don’t make 3,800 pounds a month?

    Ah well…

    Yourihttp://globalviewtoday.blogspot.com

  2. Posted 16/01/2009 at 14:07 | Permalink

    Hi Kris,

    This is nice. I’m packing my bags, as we speak–wait, I don’t make 3,800 pounds a month?

    Ah well…

    Yourihttp://globalviewtoday.blogspot.com

  3. Posted 19/01/2009 at 09:26 | Permalink

    I assume, it’s proper to use the levels in poverty. Poor in the US and UK get unemployment pack and still live in descent conditions compared to the poverty in poorest places of the planet. People at the same time (you are right) always compare what the others in society possess and own, and then feel poor. It’s a nature of needy humans to act in this manner: strive to better.
    Lichtenstein is classic place for setting offshore companies: the so-called offshore paradise. In many places (BVI, Bahamas, Cyprus) including Lichtenstein, the level of living is quite good: life is more like a real paradise. So people, poor in Lichtenstein may not be really a poor.

  4. Posted 19/01/2009 at 09:26 | Permalink

    I assume, it’s proper to use the levels in poverty. Poor in the US and UK get unemployment pack and still live in descent conditions compared to the poverty in poorest places of the planet. People at the same time (you are right) always compare what the others in society possess and own, and then feel poor. It’s a nature of needy humans to act in this manner: strive to better.
    Lichtenstein is classic place for setting offshore companies: the so-called offshore paradise. In many places (BVI, Bahamas, Cyprus) including Lichtenstein, the level of living is quite good: life is more like a real paradise. So people, poor in Lichtenstein may not be really a poor.

  5. Posted 19/01/2009 at 11:33 | Permalink

    Dear Youri,
    don’t pack your bags too quickly. After all, Liechtenstein has no bigger cities far and wide (which, in turn, makes the economic figures even more astonishing).

    Dear R.T.,
    I agree that people often assess their wellbeing by comparing themselves to others. But in order to reject the notion of “relative poverty” (RP), one need not make the strong assumption that people think only in absolute terms. They don’t. However, the advocates of RP argue that society constantly “forces” new needs on the poor. One problem with this approach is: Who precisely is “society”? If I live in Vaduz, does “society” mean “the inhabitants of Vaduz”? Of Liechtenstein? Of Liechtenstein plus Austria?

  6. Posted 19/01/2009 at 11:33 | Permalink

    Dear Youri,
    don’t pack your bags too quickly. After all, Liechtenstein has no bigger cities far and wide (which, in turn, makes the economic figures even more astonishing).

    Dear R.T.,
    I agree that people often assess their wellbeing by comparing themselves to others. But in order to reject the notion of “relative poverty” (RP), one need not make the strong assumption that people think only in absolute terms. They don’t. However, the advocates of RP argue that society constantly “forces” new needs on the poor. One problem with this approach is: Who precisely is “society”? If I live in Vaduz, does “society” mean “the inhabitants of Vaduz”? Of Liechtenstein? Of Liechtenstein plus Austria?

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