Regulation
“Name one EU regulation or law you would change?” This question is often posed to Brexiteers, usually by those who believe Eurosceptics lack detailed arguments or, worse still, didn’t know precisely what they were voting for. Though this may be true in some cases, EU-friendly commentators are also, at times, guilty of a myopia of ... Continue reading
Economic Theory
Today, Ticketmaster announced that it will close its two secondary ticket resale sites, SeatWave and Get Me In. From October, they will be replaced by a system which allows fans who no longer want a purchased ticket to resell it via Ticketmaster - but for no more than the original cover price, though with a ... Continue reading

Mark Littlewood writes for the Times Business

Mark Littlewood has written for the Times Business on how the day-to-day tactical battles over Brexit have tended to mean that no politician is seriously engaged in looking at how the world might look after our departure. In terms of taxes, the UK is by far the most centralised country in the western world. Only about ... Continue reading

Kate Andrews writes for City AM

Kate Andrews has written for City AM on how liberal reasoning is often met with such contempt. Whether it’s Johnson’s comments on the burka, or former Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron’s religious convictions, public life is increasingly unable to incorporate those who are simultaneously critical of a behaviour, yet still tolerant of other people’s right ... Continue reading
Housing and Planning

IEA Breakthrough Prize featured in the Sunday Telegraph

The Institute of Economic Affairs's Richard Koch Breakthrough Prize has been featured in the Sunday Telegraph. Author Daniel Hannan references the IEA's prize, noting that "The Institute of Economic Affairs, which is offering a £50,000 prize for the best solution to our housing shortage, has been photographing parts of the London green belt: rubbish dumps, ... Continue reading

Jamie Whyte is quoted by the Daily Express

The IEA's Dr Jamie Whyte has been quoted by the Daily Express, discussing what a 'no deal' Brexit scenario would look like. Jamie argues that what the UK imports is entirely in control of the British government, which would not want to harm consumers in this way. He also argues that a no deal Brexit ... Continue reading
One of my colleagues used to have a theory about how Britain’s housing crisis would eventually become self-limiting. It went more or less like this: the problem at the moment is that the cost of NIMBYism (i.e. organised resistance to house-building) is not borne by the NIMBYs themselves. NIMBYism, to the extent that it is ... Continue reading

Kristian Niemietz writes for CapX

One of my colleagues used to have a theory about how Britain’s housing crisis would eventually become self-limiting. It went more or less like this: the problem at the moment is that the cost of NIMBYism (i.e. organised resistance to house-building) is not borne by the NIMBYs themselves. NIMBYism, to the extent that it is ... Continue reading

Madeline Grant writes for Telegraph Refresh

Madeline Grant, Editorial Manager at the IEA, has blogged for the Telegraph Refresh on a recent action by black cab drivers against the ride-sharing app Uber. In her article, she argues that it seems an extraordinary basis for legal action - little stronger than Amstrad suing Apple for plummeting sales in the 1980s, or the Royal ... Continue reading

Kate Andrews appears on the Spectator podcast

Kate Andrews has appeared on the Spectator podcast, to discuss US sanctions on Russia, Boris Johnson's comments on the burka, and the possibility of the formation of a new centrist party. Listen here. IEA Further Reading: Classical Liberalism - A Primer... Continue reading