8 thoughts on “This anti-immigration arms race exemplifies everything that’s wrong with politicians”

  1. Posted 14/10/2014 at 11:31 | Permalink

    How does England, particularly the SE compare with the Netherlands?

    So, perhaps we should privatise our roads, schools, hospitals and de-regulate water, rail, and energy?

    Then everything would be fine, and we’d have everything run as efficiently as Tesco.

    Sounds like heaven.

  2. Posted 14/10/2014 at 13:06 | Permalink

    Submitted by Benji on Tue, 14/10/2014 – 12:31.

    How does England, particularly the SE compare with the Netherlands? So, perhaps we should privatise our roads, schools, hospitals and de-regulate water, rail, and energy? Then everything would be fine, and we’d have everything run as efficiently as Tesco. Sounds like heaven.

    depends where you mean in the Netherlands. The provinces of North Holland and South Holland (which contain the cities of Amsterdam, Rotterdam the Hague), have average population densities of 800/sq km and 1300/sq km, which I would hazard is higher than that of the SE of England other than London.

  3. Posted 14/10/2014 at 14:49 | Permalink

    There is a lot more wrong with politicians than this, but this is an extremely important issue i agree. I think that we should give a new party a chance, like the Green Party, its disgusting that some parties arnt allowed to attend the televised debate.

  4. Posted 14/10/2014 at 19:01 | Permalink

    What is the role of government; is it to carry out the wishes of the people, or is it to rule over the people? As an individual, I have the right to my opinions, whether they are right or wrong. If my opinion is prevalent, and democracy actually means something, then my (our) government should enact my opinion (within the NAP of course). If democracy doesn’t mean anything and the government can just tell the people that they are wrong, therefore their wishes will be ignored, let’s just dispense with the charade of voting for them as they are our rulers, not our representatives. The correct place to convince people of the pros or cons of immigration, or any other issue, is in the media. Once people have formed an opinion for themselves, they can select the party that advertises that they support that opinion.

  5. Posted 15/10/2014 at 11:43 | Permalink

    “perhaps we should privatise our roads, schools, hospitals and de-regulate water, rail, and energy? Then everything would be fine, and we’d have everything run as efficiently as Tesco. Sounds like heaven.”

    -Yes, that’s the idea.

  6. Posted 15/10/2014 at 12:41 | Permalink

    @ Anon

    Including cities, England has the highest population density in Europe. According to some studies anyway.

    Not that that matters in itself.

  7. Posted 15/10/2014 at 19:44 | Permalink

    Why does Mr Bourne, in common with so many other commentators who should (and probably do) know better, persist in distorting the immigration issue – especially in respect of where Ukip stands?

    Of course immigration is good, provided that a) it enables the economy to get the staff, professional or otherwise, it needs, and b) that it can determine, through work permits, who comes in and ensure that they leave when that stay expires.

    Immigration has only become a problem because of the EU and its hallowed tenet of the free movement of people. As the EU has grown in size, so the number of EU citizens who have the automatic right to enter this country, with their dependants, has increased – exponentially and particularly from the poorer, former soviet bloc member states. This was the root cause of David Cameron’s absurd panic-commitment to impose a net immigration limit. Because he could not stop any EU citizens, whether skilled or otherwise, needed or not, coming in, he made entry difficult or impossible for all the English-speaking skilled professionals we do need. All he has done is increase the pool of now resident unskilled EU workers and their dependents and starved industry of the skills it so desperately needs.

    Whether seasonal (a non-term in an EU context) farm workers from Bulgaria, Indian computer specialists or nurses and care workers from the Philippines, the work permit system, as advocated only by Ukip, would enable us to take those, and only those, we need and whom our infrastructure can support. No matter what the EU does, the end result is a not-fit-for-purpose distortion so it should not surprise that the dead hand of Brussels has made the immigration question for Britain unresolvable. And that is how it will remain as long as we stay in it.

    Tony Stone

  8. Posted 15/10/2014 at 20:04 | Permalink

    @ Kris

    To be fair, privatized schools and hospitals, with “tokens” does have some merit, as there would be some level of competition.

    However, privatized roads, and de-regulated water, energy, rail would be a disaster.

    Unless you clawed back all their monopoly profits via an LVT 😉 Which then allows the market to operate of a level playing field. No LVT=no capitalism.

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