6 thoughts on “Thinking clearly about inequality”

  1. Posted 27/07/2009 at 10:47 | Permalink

    There are some excellent articles on the issue of economic inequality in the September 2007 edition of Economic Affairs:

    http://www.iea.org.uk/record.jsp?type=economicAffairs&ID=333

  2. Posted 27/07/2009 at 10:47 | Permalink

    There are some excellent articles on the issue of economic inequality in the September 2007 edition of Economic Affairs:

    http://www.iea.org.uk/record.jsp?type=economicAffairs&ID=333

  3. Posted 27/07/2009 at 15:24 | Permalink

    A similar picture is obtained for the UK. Over the 1980s, incomes (after housing costs) of the lowest income decile fell. However, at the same time, household spending in this decile rose.
    Annual income might have been an acceptable measure of living standards in former decades, when employment histories were relatively stable. In a modern economy, they are an increasingly poor measure.

  4. Posted 27/07/2009 at 15:24 | Permalink

    A similar picture is obtained for the UK. Over the 1980s, incomes (after housing costs) of the lowest income decile fell. However, at the same time, household spending in this decile rose.
    Annual income might have been an acceptable measure of living standards in former decades, when employment histories were relatively stable. In a modern economy, they are an increasingly poor measure.

  5. Posted 01/08/2009 at 18:22 | Permalink

    Assuming that people may earn different amounts, save different proportions of their earnings, and live to different ages, clearly there are many reasons why they might end up with different (or, if you prefer, ‘unequal’) amounts of wealth, even apart from different levels of inheritance. I find it hard to get very upset about this. By the way, are we talking about global differences or national differences? Do the same moral considerations apply to both?

  6. Posted 01/08/2009 at 18:22 | Permalink

    Assuming that people may earn different amounts, save different proportions of their earnings, and live to different ages, clearly there are many reasons why they might end up with different (or, if you prefer, ‘unequal’) amounts of wealth, even apart from different levels of inheritance. I find it hard to get very upset about this. By the way, are we talking about global differences or national differences? Do the same moral considerations apply to both?

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