The Government is pressing ahead with another reorganisation of the National Health Service. It is unlikely this reordering of our essentially bureaucrat-driven model will set the world alight. Certainly there is not much chance of the NHS becoming the envy of the world.

We have seen real spending on health in the UK more than double in ten years. We now spend 10% of national income on healthcare. The old excuses about a lack of resources no longer hold water. There are no incentives for efficiency built into the system. It is not clear that this will change.

James Bartholomew in The Welfare State We’re In reported a study that suggested that the typical NHS hospital had more than four times as many support staff per nurse than a typical private hospital. This figure is difficult to verify but few employees or patients would be at all surprised to read this.

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Philip Booth is Academic and Research Director at the Institute of Economic Affairs and Professor of Finance, Public Policy and Ethics at St. Mary's University, Twickenham. From 2002-2015 he was Professor of Insurance and Risk Management at Cass Business School. Previously, Philip Booth worked for the Bank of England as an advisor on financial stability issues and he was also Associate Dean of Cass Business School and held various other academic positions at City University. He has written widely, including a number of books, on investment, finance, social insurance and pensions as well as on the relationship between Catholic social teaching and economics. He is Deputy Editor of Economic Affairs and on the editorial boards of various other academic journals. Philip is a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society, a Fellow of the Institute of Actuaries and an honorary member of the Society of Actuaries of Poland. He has previously worked in the investment department of Axa Equity and Law and was been involved in a number of projects to help develop actuarial professions and actuarial, finance and investment professional teaching programmes in Central and Eastern Europe. Philip has a BA in Economics from the University of Durham and a PhD from City University.