7 thoughts on “Norman Barry (1944-2008)”

  1. Posted 10/11/2008 at 15:00 | Permalink

    Norman sparked my interest in the Salamanca school with an excellent article in Economic Affairs just after I became Editorial and Programme Director. He also has a very nice chapter in our recent book The Legal Foundations of Free Markets which I assume was his last piece of writing.

  2. Posted 10/11/2008 at 15:00 | Permalink

    Norman sparked my interest in the Salamanca school with an excellent article in Economic Affairs just after I became Editorial and Programme Director. He also has a very nice chapter in our recent book The Legal Foundations of Free Markets which I assume was his last piece of writing.

  3. Posted 30/11/2008 at 02:00 | Permalink

    I first met Norman at a Liberty Fund Conference in the US. His book on liberalism, libertarianism, and classical liberal thinking constituted the text of the seminar. That meeting with him caused a number of important locks to open up in my thinking about liberty and public policy.

    Bill Beach

  4. Posted 30/11/2008 at 02:00 | Permalink

    I first met Norman at a Liberty Fund Conference in the US. His book on liberalism, libertarianism, and classical liberal thinking constituted the text of the seminar. That meeting with him caused a number of important locks to open up in my thinking about liberty and public policy.

    Bill Beach

  5. Posted 16/12/2008 at 11:40 | Permalink

    Arthur Seldon used to refer to him very affectionately as ‘Norah Batty’, a character in ‘Last of the Summer Wine’.

  6. Posted 16/12/2008 at 11:40 | Permalink

    Arthur Seldon used to refer to him very affectionately as ‘Norah Batty’, a character in ‘Last of the Summer Wine’.

  7. Posted 04/06/2016 at 20:51 | Permalink

    Norman Barry was my politics tutor at Buckingham, a likeable eccentric, but the epitome of what was (and is) wrong with the University, namely that it has been better at importing proponents of classical liberalism than at producing and exporting them – the opposite of Austria, which produced and exported the likes of Mises and Hayek, but is one of the most statist economies in Western Europe.

    How many of Barry’s students have gone on to great things in politics, including working in think tanks like the IEA? He was hardly Vernon Bogdanor, much less being to politics what Norman Stone has been to history!

    Buckingham is an intellectual desert, and the School of Humanities is at best an Economics Department in disguise (why else would Martin Ricketts be its Dean?) and at worst a sheltered workshop cum sinecure for libertarian fantasists like Barry subsidised by Nigerian lawyers and Malaysian accountants too stupid to notice or care what their money was being wasted on.

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