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●  John Blundell advocates the privatisation of Britain’s forests – and explains why Adam Smith must be rolling in his grave.

 

●  Eamonn Butler argues that bailing out graduates is counterproductive.

 

●  Tim Congdon and Gordon Pepper examine how to stop the recession.

 

●  Vaclav Klaus warns against more regulation and protectionism.

 

●  John Blundell discusses the achievements of Sir Alan Walters on Radio 4.

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Director

Richard Wellings was educated at Oxford and the London School of Economics, completing a PhD on transport and environmental policy at the latter in 2004. He joined the Institute in 2006 as Deputy Editorial Director. Richard is the author, co-author or editor of several papers, books and reports, including Towards Better Transport (Policy Exchange, 2008), A Beginner’s Guide to Liberty (Adam Smith Institute, 2009), High Speed 2: The Next Government Project Disaster? (IEA , 2011) and Which Road Ahead - Government or Market? (IEA, 2012). He is a Senior Fellow of the Cobden Centre and the Economic Policy Centre.

4 thoughts on “Economics on the web (13.1.08)”

  1. Posted 14/01/2009 at 11:46 | Permalink

    CONGRATULATIONS on your excellent blog!

    As a mathematician and systems analyst I look at economics through ‘hard scientific’ eyes. I have thus analysed the data base of the Bank of England, especially with a view to the Cash and the Credit share in the money supply.

    So this is just to draw your attention to analysis rather than arguments and opinion which has resulted in a number of publications – also all on the web! They could be called ‘mathematical economics from an environmental perspective’, given the challenge of climate change.

    With best wishes for your work,
    Sabine
    Organiser, Forum for Stable Currencieshttp://forumforstablecurrencies.org.uk

  2. Posted 14/01/2009 at 11:46 | Permalink

    CONGRATULATIONS on your excellent blog!

    As a mathematician and systems analyst I look at economics through ‘hard scientific’ eyes. I have thus analysed the data base of the Bank of England, especially with a view to the Cash and the Credit share in the money supply.

    So this is just to draw your attention to analysis rather than arguments and opinion which has resulted in a number of publications – also all on the web! They could be called ‘mathematical economics from an environmental perspective’, given the challenge of climate change.

    With best wishes for your work,
    Sabine
    Organiser, Forum for Stable Currencieshttp://forumforstablecurrencies.org.uk

  3. Posted 14/01/2009 at 15:19 | Permalink

    Hi,

    Great blog, indeed.

    But, Sabine;

    Isn’t what caused this economic collapse, was an over reliance on the mathematical risk analysis that guaged risk, incorrectly?

    While I know math has its place in all things, it still is only a compliment to the overall theory of economics rather than economics itself.

    You have to “feel” economics, in the overall instance.

    Best,

    Yourihttp://globalviewtoday.blogspot.com/

  4. Posted 14/01/2009 at 15:19 | Permalink

    Hi,

    Great blog, indeed.

    But, Sabine;

    Isn’t what caused this economic collapse, was an over reliance on the mathematical risk analysis that guaged risk, incorrectly?

    While I know math has its place in all things, it still is only a compliment to the overall theory of economics rather than economics itself.

    You have to “feel” economics, in the overall instance.

    Best,

    Yourihttp://globalviewtoday.blogspot.com/

Comments are closed.