Christopher Snowdon writes for Spiked

Throughout the visitation of Wuhan Virus, there has been a palpable desire from certain quarters to find a lifestyle factor to blame, but as IEA Head of Lifestyle Economics Christopher Snowdon points out, "evidence for such assertions is hard to find". Writing for Spiked, Christopher argues that the Government should ditch nanny state interventions and ... Continue reading
Lifestyle Economics

Christopher Snowdon appears on the Sky News Daily Podcast

Christopher Snowdon, Head of Lifestyle Economics at the Institute of Economic Affair, appeared on the Sky News Daily Podcast to discuss lockdown easing and when pubs might be able to reopen. Christopher told Dermot Murganhan the sector doesn't just support thousands of jobs, many of them in small family operated pubs, but also bars, restaurants, ... Continue reading

Christopher Snowdon writes for News 24

As part of the world's most draconian Covid-19 lockdown, South African President Cyril Ramaphosa instituted a complete ban on the distribution, transport and sale of alcohol on 27 March. But as IEA Head of Lifestyle Economics Christopher Snowdon warns, "the current ban is dangerous, costly and self-defeating...."It enriches criminals, robs governments of much-needed tax revenue, ... Continue reading
Lifestyle Economics

Christopher Snowdon writes for Spiked!

South Africa, India and other countries have used Covid as an excuse to ban alcohol consumption. This has had "predictably dire consequences" says the IEA's Head of Lifestyle Economics, Christopher Snowdon. Writing for Spiked!, Christopher warns against engaging in the same "failed ideology" of prohibition. Read the full article here.... Continue reading
Lifestyle Economics

Christopher Snowdon writes for The Spectator Coffee House

Attempts have been made to link the coronavirus to alcohol consumption and vaping - both of which have not been proven - but links to obesity seem to have found a sympathetic ear with the Prime Ministers, says Christopher Snowdon, Head of Lifestyle Economics at the Institute of Economic Affairs. Writing for The Spectator Coffee ... Continue reading

Emma Revell writes for CapX

According to media reports, Boris Johnson is planning to declare a war on fat in response to the links between obesity and severe coronavirus outcomes but such a campaign is "unlikely to yield the results its supporters want" says Emma Revell, Head of Communications at the Institute of Economic Affairs. Writing for CapX, Emma suggests ... Continue reading
Minimum pricing had no impact on alcohol-related deaths in Scotland in the eight months after it was introduced, reveals the Institute of Economic Affairs  After a prolonged campaign and a series of court cases, minimum unit pricing for alcohol was introduced in Scotland in May 2018 at a level of 50p per unit. A new briefing paper by Christopher Snowdon, Head ... Continue reading
Lifestyle Economics

Christopher Snowdon writes for The Spectator USA

Public health groups have quickly realised the public are willing to temporarily sacrifice liberty for safety and seized the opportunity to push pet policies as a help or solution to the coronavirus crisis, says Christopher Snowdon, Head of Lifestyle Economics for the Institute of Economic Affairs. Writing for The Spectator USA, Christopher gives examples of ... Continue reading
Responding to the introduction of minimum pricing in Wales (Monday 2nd March), the IEA’s head of lifestyle economics, Christopher Snowdon, said: “Early evidence from Scotland suggests that minimum pricing has no impact on alcohol-related deaths and little, if any, impact on alcohol sales. "Many Welsh residents will be able to avoid higher prices by doing ... Continue reading

Christopher Snowdon quoted in The Sun

"The idea that wine consumed in restaurants has any significant impact on the number of alcohol-related deaths is just daft", says Christopher Snowdon, Head of Lifestyle Economics at the Institute of Economic Affairs. Christopher is quoted in The Sun and the Scottish Sun responding to a University of Cambridge study which suggested limited the size ... Continue reading