Lifestyle Economics

Christopher Snowdon comments for The Express

Christopher Snowdon, IEA Head of Lifestyle Economics, has commented for The Express on the government's decision to reverse their upcoming ban on buy-one-get-one-free deals on junk food. "Banning cheap food deals when inflation is rising to a 40 year high was never going to end well." "Boris Johnson was bounced into this regressive policy by ... Continue reading
Lifestyle Economics

Annabel Denham writes for The Spectator

Annabel Denham, IEA Director of Communications, has written for The Spectator on the detrimental impact that 'sin taxes' on products such as junk food and alcohol have on lower-income earners. In the wake of new research published by the IEA on the cost that minimum alcohol pricing has had on Scottish drinkers, Annabel argues that ... Continue reading

IEA research referenced in The National

A new paper on minimum unit pricing in Scotland, co-authored by Christopher Snowdon, IEA Head of Lifestyle Economics, has been referenced in The National. The paper concludes that minimum unit pricing has had little impact on improving public health and has cost Scottish consumers £270m. “Although alcohol consumption has fallen slightly in Scotland, we find ... Continue reading

IEA research referenced in the Daily Mail

A new paper on minimum unit pricing in Scotland, co-authored by Christopher Snowdon, IEA Head of Lifestyle Economics, has been referenced in the Daily Mail. The paper concludes that minimum unit pricing has had little impact on improving public health and has cost Scottish consumers £270m. "Our estimate suggests that minimum pricing has cost Scottish ... Continue reading

Christopher Snowdon writes for The Publican Morning Advertiser

Christopher Snowdon, IEA Head of Lifestyle Economics, has commented on a paper, published by the University of Stirling, linking more prominent health warnings on alcohol products with an increased stigmatisation of drinking. Christopher argues that the role of health warnings is not to repel the consumer, but to provide them with impartial information about the ... Continue reading
Lifestyle Economics

IEA research referenced in City AM

New research on the benefits of vaping over smoking, written by the IEA's Christopher Snowdon and Victoria Hewson, has been referenced in City AM. Christopher and Victoria argue that a combination of misinformation spread by public health bodies, poorly-planned regulation and risk aversion have stunted the benefits that innovative tobacco alternatives could bring. Their new ... Continue reading
Lifestyle Economics

Christopher Snowdon comments for The Sun

Christopher Snowdon, IEA Head of Lifestyle Economics, has commented for The Sun on the misinformation being promoted around vaping. "There is plenty of evidence of that vaping is largely harmless to people and it is vastly safer than smoking." "Unfortunately, smokers are being scared off vaping by the torrent of junk science coming from America ... Continue reading
Lifestyle Economics

Christopher Snowdon quoted in the Daily Mail

Christopher Snowdon, IEA Head of Lifestyle Economics, has been quoted by the Daily Mail following news that a 'soda tax' in Seattle has led to a 7% increase in the volume of alcohol purchased. Christopher was quoted as saying, "The good people of Seattle responded to a tax on sugary drinks by buying more beer." ... Continue reading

Christopher Snowdon and Emily Carver referenced in the Daily Mail

Christopher Snowdon, IEA Head of Lifestyle Economics, has commented in the Daily Mail on the government's aim to ban single-use sauce sachets from restaurants as part of its environmental plan. Christopher said: "The government's appetite for petty regulation and micro-management is boundless."  "With the economy in the doldrums and inflation rising, banning things seems to ... Continue reading

Mark Littlewood writes for The Times

Mark Littlewood, IEA Director General, has written his column in The Times on the ineffectiveness of sugar taxes, highlighting their regressive nature and history of failure in getting people fit. As Mark points out: "A study published in The Lancet in 2017 prophesied that a cut in added sugar of 40 per cent could, over five ... Continue reading