New IEA report by Prof Len Shackleton

With "fewer that one on 6 home workers will be able to work productively during the Coronavirus outbreak", people are having to re-examine their home and working practices right now. The findings of new IEA report 'Pass the Remote: Why we can't all work from home' were discussed on BBC Radio 4 in light of ... Continue reading

IEA responds to figures from the British Chambers of Commerce

Responding to figures from the British Chambers of Commerce which suggest nearly half of businesses plan to furlough at least half of their staff under the government's wage scheme, Andy Mayer, Chief Operating Officer at the Institute of Economic Affairs, said: “The figures in the BCC survey are disappointing but not surprising. “The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme was designed ... Continue reading
Professor Len Shackleton, Editorial and Research Fellow at the Institute of Economic Affairs, said: “The decision to raise the National Living Wage by an unprecedented 6.2%, and other minimum wages by significant amounts, always risked scuppering employment growth, particularly in poorer regions where arbitrary wage hikes could offset the government’s plans to boost investment and ... Continue reading
Labour Market

Emma Revell writes for City A.M.

Studies show working from home can have a positive effect on productivity and lead to a reduction in sick leave but we shouldn't expect coronavirus to revolutionise our working lives, says Emma Revell, Head of Communications at the Institute of Economic Affairs. Writing for City A.M., Emma argues that those suggesting we may never return ... Continue reading
No more than 15% of healthy workers confined to their homes will work productively, argues new research from the Institute of Economic Affairs. Government restrictions on social interaction designed to slow the spread of coronavirus have led to a rapid increase in the number of people working from home. But a new briefing paper from the ... Continue reading
Commenting on Chancellor Rishi Sunak's plans to support the self-employed during the Covid-19 pandemic Julian Jessop, Economics Fellow at the Institute of Economic Affairs, said: “The Chancellor has done a good job in drawing up a sensible package to support the self-employed, which is a relatively diverse group of people with different needs and different ... Continue reading

IEA research cited in The Daily Telegraph

IEA research from 'The Shadow Economy' by Friedrich Schneider and Colin Williams was referenced in The Daily Telegraph. In an article discussing the risk of 'hidden' workers in the grey economy spreading coronavirus, the article noted that "the Institute for Economic Affairs have put the potential overall size of this shadow economy at between 9pc ... Continue reading

Andy Mayer writes for City AM

With businesses ordered to close and workers to self-isolate, the government is attempting to protect the wages of those impacted to avoid them breaking quarantine to go job-hunting. However, as the IEA's chief operating officer argues for City AM, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme "needs some more tweaking". Unchanged, it could do significant damage to ... Continue reading

IEA responds to government decision to suspend enforcement of gender pay gap reporting in light of the Covid-19 pandemic

Commenting on Equalities Minister Liz Truss’s decision to suspend enforcement of gender pay gap reporting in light of the Covid-19 pandemic Annabel Denham, Director of Communications at the Institute of Economic Affairs, said: "The government’s suspension of compulsory reporting for this year, given the unprecedented pressures placed on businesses by Covid-19, is a welcome move. ... Continue reading

Julian Jessop writes for City AM

In normal times, cash payments regardless of individual need would be too expensive, poorly targeted, and distortionary, says IEA Economics Fellow Julian Jessop. However, as Julian argues in a debate column for City AM, these are not normal times, and "an initial sum payment of, say, £1,000 to each person of work age would go ... Continue reading